Management of neurogenic bowel dysfunction in the community after spinal cord injury: a postal survey in the United Kingdom.

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dc.contributor.author Coggrave, M
dc.contributor.author Norton, Christine
dc.date.accessioned 2012-05-23T12:17:19Z
dc.date.available 2012-05-23T12:17:19Z
dc.date.issued 2012-05-23
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/363
dc.description.abstract Spinal Cord, 47, 323-333, doi; 10.1038/sc.2008.137 (2009) Study design: Postal survey Objectives: To describe bowel management in community-dwelling spinal cord-injured (SCI) individuals and to explore associations between age, injury, dependency, problems, interventions and satisfaction. Setting: Outpatients of a single SCI unit, in the United Kingdom. Methods: Postal questionnaire to all outpatients with SCI for at least 1 year, of any level or density, aged 18 years or more. Results: Response rate was 48.6% (n=1334). Median age was 52 years, median duration of injury 18 years. The most common intervention was digital evacuation (56%). Up to 30 min was spent on each bowel care episode by 58% of respondents; 31–60 min by 22%; 14% spent over 60 min. Reported problems included constipation (39%), haemorrhoids (36%) and abdominal distension (31%). Reduced satisfaction with bowel function was associated with longer duration of each bowel care episode, faecal incontinence, greater number of interventions used and more problems reported (all Pless than or equal to0.001); 130 (9.7%) had undergone any type of surgical bowel intervention. Impact of bowel dysfunction on the respondent's life was rated as significantly greater than other aspects of SCI (Pless than or equal to0.001). Conclusions: Managing SCI bowel function in the community is complex, time consuming and remains conservative. Despite potential for bias from a low response, for this large group of responders, bowel dysfunction impacted most on life compared with other SCI-related impairments. The study findings demand further exploration of bowel management to reduce impact, minimize side effects and increase the choice of management strategies available.Spinal Cord 47, 323-333, doi; 10.1038/sc.2008.137 (2009) en_US
dc.subject neurogenic bowel en_US
dc.subject bowel management en_US
dc.subject community setting en_US
dc.subject spinal cord injury en_US
dc.subject postal survey en_US
dc.title Management of neurogenic bowel dysfunction in the community after spinal cord injury: a postal survey in the United Kingdom. en_US
dc.type Article en_US

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